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Keynote Lectures

The Digital Accessibility from the User Point of View
Julio Abascal, University of the Basque Country/Euskal Herriko Uniberstitatea, Spain

Grand Challenges for Human-Computer Interaction: The Shift towards Smart-Environment Interaction and Citizen-Centered Design
Norbert Streitz, Founder and Scientific Director, Smart Future Initiative, Germany

The Ordinal Nature of Psychophysiology
Georgios N. Yannakakis, University of Malta, Malta

 

The Digital Accessibility from the User Point of View

Julio Abascal
University of the Basque Country/Euskal Herriko Uniberstitatea
Spain
 

Brief Bio
Julio Abascal is a Professor of the Computer Architecture and Technology Department of the UPV/EHU since 1981. In 1985 he co-founded the EGOKITUZ Laboratory of HCI for Special Needs. His research activity is focused on the application of HCI methods and techniques to the Assistive Technology, including the design of ubiquitous, adaptive and accessible user interfaces. He is the Spanish representative in the IFIP TC 13 on HCI from 1991, and the former and founder chairman (in 1993) of IFIP WG 13.3 “HCI and Disability”.


Abstract
From its foundation in 1985, the Egokituz Laboratory of HCI for Special Needs has researched the application of diverse HCI methodologies and technologies to enhance the inclusion and digital accessibility of people with diverse types of disabilities. Along this time we discovered that the human side of the HCI requires specific attention that technology oriented people -we- are not always qualified to pay. In this talk I will review some mistakes that lead us to learn it and our approaches to overcome them.



 

 

Grand Challenges for Human-Computer Interaction: The Shift towards Smart-Environment Interaction and Citizen-Centered Design

Norbert Streitz
Founder and Scientific Director, Smart Future Initiative
Germany
 

Brief Bio
Dr. Norbert Streitz (Ph.D. in physics, Ph.D. in cognitive science) is a Senior Scientist and Strategic Advisor with more than 35 years of experience in information and communication technology. Founder and Scientific Director of the Smart Future Initiative launched in 2009. From 1987-2008, he held positions as Deputy Director and Division Manager at the Fraunhofer Institute IPSI, Darmstadt, e.g., founding and managing the research division "AMBIENTE – Smart Environments of the Future". Teaching appointments at the Department of Computer Science, Technical University Darmstadt for more than 15 years. Before Fraunhofer, he was Assistant Professor at the Technical University Aachen (RWTH), where he founded and managed ACCEPT (AaChen Cognitive Ergonomics ProjecT). At different times of his career, he was a post-doc research fellow at the University of California, Berkeley, a visiting scholar at Xerox PARC, Menlo Park, and at the Intelligent Systems Lab of MITI, Tsukuba Science City, Japan.

He has published/edited 25 books and authored/coauthored more than 150 scientific peerreviewed papers. His research and teaching activities cover a wide range of areas: Cognitive Science, Human-Computer Interaction, Hypertext/Hypermedia, Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW), Ubiquitous Computing, Artificial Intelligence and Ambient Intelligence, Privacy Enhancing Technologies (Privacy by Design), Interaction and Experience Design, Hybrid Worlds, Autonomous Driving, Smart Cities and Smart Airports.

Principal Investigator and Manager of many projects funded by the European Commission (EC) (e.g., Disappearing Computer Initiative, Ambient Agoras, Towards the Humane City, …) and by industrial and public national and international funding agencies. Reviewer and evaluation expert for the EC, member of Editorial Boards (e.g., Journal of Ambient Intelligence and Smart Environments, Journal of Ambient Intelligence and Humanized Computing) and Advisory Boards of research institutes in Europe and Asia, consultant, and keynote speaker.

He has been organizing many conferences as general or program chair during his long career, too many to list here. During the last six years, he is the program chair of the International Conference on Distributed, Ambient and Pervasive Interactions (DAPI), now in its sixth edition as DAPI 2018.


Abstract
Available Soon.



 

 

The Ordinal Nature of Psychophysiology

Georgios N. Yannakakis
University of Malta
Malta
 

Brief Bio
Georgios N. Yannakakis (yannakakis.net) is a Professor and Director of the Institute of Digital Games, University of Malta. He is a leading expert of the game artificial intelligence research field with core theoretical contributions in machine learning, evolutionary computation, affective computing and player modelling, computational creativity and procedural content generation. He has published more than 220 papers and his work has been cited broadly. He has attracted funding from several EU and national research agencies and received multiple awards for published work in top-tier journals and conferences. His work has been featured in New Scientist, Science Magazine, The Guardian, Le Monde and other venues. He is regularly invited to give keynote talks in the most recognised conferences in his areas of research activity and has organised a few of the most respected conferences in the areas of game AI and game research. He has been an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Computational Intelligence and AI in Games and the IEEE Transactions on Affective Computing journals; he is currently an Associate editor of the IEEE Transactions in Games. He is the co-author of the Artificial Intelligence and Games Textbook.


Abstract
How is a psychological state best labelled and in turn captured by a computational model? What are the challenges of annotating the magnitude of physiological manifestations? Is it meaningful to represent any subjective phenomenon as a number of predefined classes? 
What if the magnitude or the class of an emotion are simply irrelevant (or even inappropriate!) labels for modelling psychophysiology? 
In this talk I will attempt to address the above questions by viewing the field of psychophysiology under an ordinal perspective. I will first outline the theoretical reasons and empirical evidence to favour ordinal labels for representing and annotating psychological states and then I will discuss the good, bad and ugly practices of their processing. The advantages of the ordinal approach will be showcased via a number of representative studies in machine learning, psychophysiology, affective computing, and human computer interaction. 
I will conclude the talk by reflecting upon the main limitations of the ordinal perspective.



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