PRIMORIS      Contacts      FAQs      INSTICC Portal
 

Keynote Lectures

Magic Happen Here: Models, Methods and Myths in Design
Larry Constantine, M-ITI, Portugal

Available Soon
Chris Csíkszentmihályi, M-ITI, Portugal

Cultural Heritage in the Cloud – How the Internet can Support the Survival and Growth of a Culture
Gerrit van der Veer, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (VUA), Netherlands

Designing for Situation Awareness – the World behind the Glass
Max Mulder, TU Delft, Netherlands

 

Magic Happen Here: Models, Methods and Myths in Design

Larry Constantine
M-ITI
Portugal
 

Brief Bio
Larry Constantine, ACM Fellow, Life Member of the Industrial Designers Society of America, is an Institute Fellow at Madeira Interactive Technologies Institute, Funchal, Portugal. An award-winning designer specializing in interaction design for complex systems and services, he is the developer of widely used techniques in interaction design and software engineering, including essential use cases, human activity modeling, and data flow diagrams. His research interests center on the role of models and modeling in systems and service design processes. His publications include over 200 papers and articles and more than two dozen books, among them Software for Use, co-authored with Lucy Lockwood, winner of the Jolt Award. A former professor at the University of Madeira, he is a recipient of the Stevens Award for his pioneering contributions to design and development methods. Under his pen name, Lior Samson, he is the author of nine novels, including Bashert, a 2015 winner of the Hoffer Award, and most recently, The Millicent Factor (Gesher Press, 2016).


Abstract
At the highest and best levels of expression, design combines elements of investigation and invention, creativity and critical evaluation, disciplined attention to detail and inspired innovation. How do these competing contributions operate within the process of design as praciced? How do we understand the performance practices of the rock stars of design, who seemingly generate award-winning products and disruptive technologies at the wave of a hand, alongside those of their more straight-line engineering counterparts, who crank out web sites and successive simple apps? In this presentation, one of the pioneers in design methods and models will explore the relative roles of inspired invention and disciplined design in the actual practice of IxD and UxD, with particular attention to the relationship between invention and solved problems, between originality and reuse of proven approaches. The role of models in managing the magic of design will also be addressed.



 

 

Keynote Lecture

Chris Csíkszentmihályi
M-ITI
Portugal
 

Brief Bio
Christopher Csikszentmihályi defines himself as an artist, designer, technologist and dude. He is known for inspiring and developing political technologies that rebalance power between citizens, corporations, and governments. Recently he started the Rootio project in collaboration with UNICEF a sociotechnical platform for community radio that will work to make community radio networked, interactive, and scalable but still  inexpensive, while maintaining roots in  small, linguistically diverse communities.

Before joining Madeira-ITI Csikszentmihállyi was a professor at colleges, universities, and institutes, including Distinguished Visiting Professor of Art and Design Research at Parsons the New School for Design. He cofounded and directed the MIT Center for Future Civic Media (C4), which was dedicated to developing technologies that strengthen communities. He also founded the MIT Media Lab's Computing Culture group, which worked to create unique media technologies for cultural and political applications. Trained as an artist, he has worked in the intersection of new technologies, media, and the arts for 16 years, lecturing, showing new media work, and presenting installations on five continents and one subcontinent. He was a 2005 Rockefeller New Media Fellow, and a 2007-2008 fellow at Harvard's Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and has taught at the University of California at San Diego, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and at Turku University.

He also has been represented by the Location One Gallery in New York's SoHo and Fringe Exhibitions in Los Angeles. He toured museums and nightclubs with his mechanical hip hop device, DJ I, Robot, which was nominated for the Best Artistic Software award at Berlin's Transmediale, while a previous piece, Natural Language Processor, was commissioned by the KIASMA Museum in Helsinki, Finland. The catalog for his installations Skin and Control is published by Charta and distributed by DAP, and he served on the National Academy of Science's IT and Creativity panel.

Chris received his BFA from School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1994 and an MFA from the University of California, San Diego in 1998, he also holds a PhD(hc) Cornish College of the Arts.


Abstract
Available Soon



 

 

Cultural Heritage in the Cloud – How the Internet can Support the Survival and Growth of a Culture

Gerrit van der Veer
Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (VUA)
Netherlands
 

Brief Bio
Gerrit C. van der Veer has been a researcher and teacher in University since 1961.He started in Cognitive Psychology, moved to Ergonomics, and into Computer Science, where he specialized in design of interactive systems. He has been teaching in many European countries including Belgium, Germany, Spain, Italy, Romania, and the Netherlands, as well as in India and China.
His research concerns user centered design methods, task modeling, individual differences, cultural differences, mental models, cultural heritage, and visualization.
He is currently supervising PhD Students for the Dutch Open University Faculty of Computer Science, and Twente University (Netherlands) department of Human-Media Interaction; and teaching courses at the Maritime University of Dalian (China) Sino-European Usability Centre, and at Lu Xun Academy of Fine Arts, Department of Multimedia and Animation, Shenyang (China).
Gerrit is Past President of ACM SIGCHI, the world leading international society for human-computer interaction.


Abstract
People develop, share, and live cultures (age groups, communities, societies, arts). If the cultures live longer than the individual member, the members create or collect, maintain, and share artifacts (tools, pieces of art, stories, rituals) that support maintenance of the culture, and hand down records of memories of valuable experiences.
Living a culture means learning from the past and teaching to the next generation, and at the same time re-building the culture in the current context. Cultural knowledge is a moving, as well as a growing, re-source (a source and a sink) for this process. We will discuss how ICT can support this and how to teach the design of ICT support to computer science students and to cultural heritage scholars.



 

 

Designing for Situation Awareness – the World behind the Glass

Max Mulder
TU Delft
Netherlands
 

Brief Bio
Max received his MSc. (1992, Aerospace Engineering) degree and Ph.D. (1999, Aerospace Engineering, cum laude) degree from the Delft University of Technology, both for his work on the cybernetics of perspective flight-path displays.
He is currently Full Professor and Head of the section Control & Simulation, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology. Max teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in signal processing, systems and control theory, stochastic processes, avionics and air transportation systems, and human-machine systems.
His research interests include: (1) cybernetics and its use in modeling human perception and performance, in particular in the context of flight simulation and manual control, and (2) the application of cognitive systems engineering principles in the design of ecological human-machine systems. Max (co-)authored more than 500 peer-reviewed academic publications.


Abstract
In the design of human-machine interfaces a central question is how to obtain and validate a design that is capable of supporting an operator's situation awareness of the process under control. Whereas many research efforts go into the question of 'what is the operator aware of?' - the awareness - less investigations address the problem of determining what the operator should be aware of in the first place, that is, ‘what exactly constitutes a situation’? The presentation will discuss the research activities at TU Delft that aim at answering this second question, and which follow an ‘ecological approach’ to design human-machine systems for future air transportation concepts. The clever use of automation tools and novel visualizations will be presented that allow human operators (pilots, air traffic controllers) in dealing with complex tasks. The airborne self-separation task will be taken as an example of showing how ecological interfaces can support pilots in their decision making.



footer