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Keynote Lectures

Wearable Computing Systems based on Body Sensor Networks: State-of-the-art and Future Research Challenges
Giancarlo Fortino, University of Calabria, Italy

Information, Understanding and Trust: Explorations in Computation and Interaction
Ann Blandford, UCLIC, University College London, United Kingdom

Available soon.
Yvonne Rogers, UCLIC, University College London, United Kingdom

Available soon.
Anind K. Dey, Carnegie Mellon University, United States

 

Wearable Computing Systems based on Body Sensor Networks: State-of-the-art and Future Research Challenges

Giancarlo Fortino
University of Calabria
Italy
 

Brief Bio
Giancarlo Fortino (SM’12) is Full Professor of Computer Engineering at the Dept. of Informatics, Modeling, Electronics and Systems (DIMES) of the University of Calabria (Unical), Rende (CS), Italy. He has a Ph. D. degree and Laurea (MSc+BSc) degree in Computer Engineering from Unical. He is High-end Foreign Expert of China (term 2015-2018), Adjunct and Guest Professor at the Wuhan University of Technology (China), High-end Expert of HUST (China), CAS PIFI Visiting Scientist at Shenzhen (2019-2021), Distinguished Professor of Huazhong Agricultural University (China) and Associated Senior Research Fellow at the Italian National Research Council - ICAR Institute. He has been also Visiting Researcher and Professor at the International Computer Science Institute (Berkeley, USA, 97-99) and at the Queensland University of Technology (Australia, 2009), respectively. He is in the list of Top Italian Scientists (TIS) by VIA-academy, with h-index=48 and 8500+ citations according to GS. According to the SciVal tool in the last 5 years (2013-18), he is ranked N. 1 in the topic “Middleware, Internet, and Sensor Networks” and N.56 in the Computer Science field in the ranking of authors with high citation impact based on the FWCI index at the Scopus Database. He is the director of the SPEME (Smart, Pervasive and Mobile Systems Engineering) Lab at DIMES, Unical and co-director of three joint-labs on IoT technologies established with Wuhan University of Technology, Shanghai Maritime University, and Huazhong Agricultural University, respectively. His main research interests include Internet of Things computing and technology, agent-based computing, body area networks, human-machine systems, wireless sensor networks, pervasive and cloud computing, multimedia networks, and mobile health systems. He participated to many local, national and international research projects and was also the deputy coordinator and scientific & technical project manager of the EU-funded (8M) H2020 INTER-IoT project. He authored 400+ publications in journals, conferences and books. He chaired 100+ Int'l conferences/workshops, organized 50+ special issues in well-known ISI-impacted Int'l Journals, and participated in the TPC of about 500 conferences. He is the founding editor in chief of the IEEE Book Series on “Human-Machine Systems” and of the Springer Book Series on "Internet of Things: Technology, Communications and Computing”, and currently serves (as associate editor) in the editorial board of IEEE Transactions on Affective Computing, IEEE Transactions on Human-Machine Systems, IEEE IoT Journal, IEEE Sensors Journal, IEEE Access, IEEE SMC Magazine, Journal of Networks and Computer Applications, Engineering Applications of Artificial Intelligence, Information Fusion, and others. He is the recipient of the 2014 Andrew P. Sage SMC Best Transactions Paper award. He is co-founder and CEO of SenSysCal S.r.l., a spin-off of Unical, developing innovative IoT-based systems for e-health and domotics. He is the Chair of the IEEE SMC Italian Chapter, Member-at-large of the IEEE SMCS BoG, Member of the IEEE Press Board of Directors, and founding chair of the IEEE SMC Technical Committee on “Interactive and Wearable Computing and Devices”.


Abstract
Wearable computing is a relatively new area of research and development that aims at supporting people in different application domains: health-care (monitoring assisted livings), fitness (monitoring athletes), social interactions (enabling multi-user activity recognition, e.g. handshake), videogames (enabling joystick-less interactions), factory (monitoring employees in their activity), etc. Wearable computing is based on wearable computing devices/interfaces such as sensor nodes (e.g. to measure heart rate, temperature, blood oxygen, etc), common life objects (e.g. watch, belt, etc), smartphones/PDA. Wearable computing has been recently boosted by the introduction of body sensor networks (BSNs), i.e. networks of wireless wearable sensor nodes coordinated by more capable coordinators (smartphones, tablets, PCs). Although the basic elements (sensors, protocols, coordinators) of a BSN are available (already from a commercial point of view), developing BSN systems/applications is a complex task that requires suitable design methods based on effective and efficient programming frameworks. In this keynote, we will first discuss the state-of-the-art of currently available wearable computing systems based on BSNs. Then, we will focus on the main results achieved in the SPINE project (http://spine.deis.unical.it), currently led by Prof. Fortino’s research group, in terms of defined models, methodology, algorithms and real prototypes (e.g. activity/gesture recognition systems, fall detection systems, mobile ECG processing systems, elbow/knee rehabilitation systems, emotion recognition systems, etc.). Finally, the keynote will enumerate and discuss future research challenges along with possible solutions in such exciting research area.




 

 

Information, Understanding and Trust: Explorations in Computation and Interaction

Ann Blandford
UCLIC, University College London
United Kingdom
 

Brief Bio
Ann Blandford is Professor of Human–Computer Interaction at University College London and Deputy Director (Digital) of the UCL Institute of Healthcare Engineering. She is an expert on human factors for health technologies. Her first degree is in Mathematics and her PhD in Artificial Intelligence. She was a post-doctoral researcher at the Applied Psychology Unit in Cambridge then a Lecturer, rising to Professor, at Middlesex University (Computer Science). She moved to UCL as Senior Lecturer in 2002, and was (re-)promoted to Professor in 2005. She was Director of UCL Interaction Centre 2004-2011. She is involved in several research projects studying health technology design and user experience. The question that motivates her research is: how can we design and deploy health technologies that really work for people, rather than technologies that force us into undesirable modes of working, cause stress, or are rejected as not being fit for purpose? She has published widely on the design and use of interactive health technologies, and on how technology can be designed to better support people’s needs and values.


Abstract
Computers store and process data. People make sense of information, construct personal meaning and base decisions on it. Computing technologies can enhance human cognition in many exciting ways. However, there are inherent mismatches between the ways computers process data and the ways people make sense of it. In this talk, I will draw on examples from health technologies to discuss some of the important mismatches and how we can minimise them through design. This will include mundane data processing systems, tools for self-tracking and behaviour change, social computing, and contemporary Artificial Intelligence technologies. Looking to the future, I will highlight some of the key priorities for optimising people’s trust in future technologies and empowering people through information and understanding. 



 

 

Available soon.

Yvonne Rogers
UCLIC, University College London
United Kingdom
 

Brief Bio
Yvonne Rogers is a Professor of Interaction Design, the director of UCLIC and a deputy head of the Computer Science department at University College London. Her research interests are in the areas of ubiquitous computing, interaction design and human-computer interaction. A central theme of her work is concerned with designing interactive technologies that augment humans. A current focus of her research is on human data interaction. She is also interested in what human-centered AI means in practice. Central to her work is a critical stance towards how visions, theories and frameworks shape the fields of HCI, cognitive science and Ubicomp. She has been instrumental in promulgating new theories (e.g., external cognition), alternative methodologies (e.g., in the wild studies) and far-reaching research agendas (e.g., "Being Human: HCI in 2020"). She has also published two monographs "HCI Theory: Classical, Modern and Contemporary." and "Research in the Wild." with Paul Marshall. She is a fellow of the ACM, BCS and the ACM CHI Academy.


Abstract
Available soon.



 

 

Available soon.

Anind Dey
Carnegie Mellon University
United States
 

Brief Bio
Available soon.


Abstract
Available soon.



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